Vivid Relics: Shawn McNulty and Michael Sweere

RosaluxPoster

Opening Reception: June 3 rd , 7-10pm
Exhibition Dates: June 3 rd -25 th 2017

Rosalux Gallery presents “Vivid Relics” – a new exhibition featuring the dynamic
paintings of Shawn McNulty and folk-inspired works by Michael Sweere. Each artist
creates work that commands the attention of the viewer, and both McNulty and Sweere
are featured in the U.S. Bank Stadium art collection.

Artery McNulty

Shawn McNulty’s signature abstractions have evolved over the past 20 years into a
more organic territory with some subtle ties back to his geometric pieces with rigid
edges. He utilizes a “shoe palette knife,” which allows him to work the canvas on the
floor with his feet, along with random tools like a Swiffer and pieces of plastic. The
result of this process is refreshing and innovative forms comprised of thick acrylic and
pumice, along with his masterful grasp of color theory. McNulty is essentially an action
painter, but there’s a heavy dose of energized color fields throughout his work, which
lend itself to a “calmness over chaos” vibe. His work can be found in private and
corporate collections all over the world including that of General Mills and President Bill
Clinton.

 

Musky Sweere

With the recent installation of his mural at the new Webber Park Library in Minneapolis,
Michael Sweere shifts gears and brings something completely different to Rosalux
Gallery in June. Mr. Sweere’s affinity of American folk art is evident in his newest
installation. A detour from his familiar mosaic work, the exhibition features a wide
range of polychromed (painted) woodcarvings. His characters – inspired
by imagination, native tales and urban folklore invite viewers of all ages to experience
the wonder of “Folk-O- Rama.”

Banner Images:

Tombstone, Shawn McNulty 40×80” (diptych) acrylic and pumice on canvas

Animal Woodcarvings, Michael Sweere – various sizes

Press Release Images:

Artery, Shawn McNulty, 40″ x 40″ acrylic and pumice on canvas

Muskie, Michael Sweere, Tin-wrapped woodcarving